Application SpotLIGHT – May 2020: Multiplexed imaging of gene expression using the CELESTA light engine®

Multiplexed imaging of gene expression using the CELESTA light engine®

MERFISH (multiplex error robust fluorescence in situ hybridization) is an imaging technique that profiles cell populations based on the identification of thousands oRNA transcripts per cell.  The CELESTA light engine is an ideal and widely-adopted illumination source for this application.  In a recent paper published in Nature [1], Wheeler and co-workers used MERFISH imaging with a CELESTA light engine to quantify the expression of nine specific astrocyte and T-cell markers.  Five of the CELESTA light engine’s seven laser lines were used in the highly multiplexed MERFISH imaging protocol.  The overall objective of the research described in the paper was to characterize astrocyte populations that contribute to pathogenesis in a preclinical model of multiple sclerosis.

Reference
[1]
MA Wheeler, JR Moffitt, IC Clark, EC Tjon, Z Li, SE J Zandee, CP Couturier, BR Watson, G Scalisi, S Alkwai, V Rothhammer, A Rotem, JA Heyman, S Thaploo, LM Sanmarco, J Ragoussis, DA Weitz, K Petrecca, JR Moffitt, B Becher, JP Antel, A Prat, FJ Quintana, Nature (2020) 578:593–5990

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Light BYTES – May 2020: Independent Intensity and Pulse Width Control for Stroboscopic Illumination with the SPECTRA X light engine®

Independent Intensity and Pulse Width Control for Stroboscopic Illumination

Evaluation of photo-stimulation intensity dependence is often a necessary part of neuromodulation experimentation utilized in optogenetics studies [1]. The inherent stability and quantitative nature of Lumencor’s SPECTRA X light engine® make it particularly well suited as the pulsed light source of choice for studies requiring pulse width and frequency of stroboscopic illumination analyses. Find more detail regarding this extremely stable, reproducible, and well-behaved data, as well as a specific reference in a recent Journal of Physiology publication by authors Kubota, Sidikejiang, and Seki, on Lumencor’s website.

Figure Description: Alternating cyan (485/25 nm, ~0.5 ms) and green (560/32 nm, ~3 ms) output pulses generated by TTL triggering of a SPECTRA X light engine. Two superimposed oscilloscope traces are shown in which the cyan intensity is adjusted from 100% to 55% via RS232 serial commands while the green intensity remains constant. Separation of the cyan and green pulses is ~0.25 ms.

Reference

[1] S Kubota, W Sidikejiang, K Seki et al. J Physiol(2019) 597:5025–5040

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